Disrupt Welfare For Sickle – Keep It Simple

I’ve worked within the sickle cell community now for a little under two years and am pleased with what we’ve achieved so far in the area of welfare support; personal independence payment (PIP) in particular. As I’ve always said, PIP is not the easiest of benefits to get because it was designed not to be easy to get. However, we are getting good results for our clients and that’s really fantastic. In my view, we are achieving these outcomes because of the approach we’ve taken. Sickle cell disease as a condition, fluctuates wildly in the level of pain and discomfort sufferers experience each day. All too often, everyone focuses on what sufferers are unable to do during crisis or what they can do during good periods. This in my view is not the best approach for a condition like sickle cell which in most people, inflict daily pain like nothing we know. Crisis happens to be the extreme but does not occur daily in majority of cases. Therefore, by focusing on crisis, we forget the most important aspect of the application process. PIP is all about points, especially at the consultation stage. To get the points, we need to firstly, explain the limitations sickle cell disease places on our ability to do simple day to day activities most of the time, not just during crisis. Secondly, our explanations need to fit within prescribed set of phrases referred to as “descriptors”. This is the key to our success with PIP applications. We’ve simply, rightly, moved the emphasis away from crisis and focused instead on the constant daily pain and discomfort experienced by most sickle cell patients at levels that their peers cannot possibly live with daily. Simple strategy but it gets the results.
I certainly would not give anyone a cast iron guarantee on a successful PIP application but I do know that I can get you better prepared for the two key stages of the application process; the form completion and the consultation. If you can go into the consultation prepared and ready to answer the questions as per the descriptors, you will extract the points. You would therefore have 70 to 95 percent chance of getting a better outcome. What rate of PIP you get paid all depends on your ability to execute the strategy on the day. That’s it. Guaranteed. My first sickle cell focused PIP workshop is now fully subscribed but I plan to hold more. You have absolutely nothing to loose by attending one. 

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6 Comments Add yours

  1. Admire kamara says:

    Daniel, word will not suffice what you do for this community, but at this point they are all I have. I appreciate your time, effort, dedication and non stop support towards myself and my kids. You are my counsellor, sounding board, advicer and above all you became my friend. Thank you for your tireless effort in the sickle cell community. We love honor and appreciate all the hard work you put into this community. Like I said earlier on, words can never be enough to express my gratitude, but that’s all I have right now. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Admire. It really does mean a lot to me when the efforts we put into our community and friendships end up creating such special bonds in us. Very humbling and I’m very grateful. Thank you.

      Like

  2. Elizabeth Fola Somoye says:

    Thank you Daniel for all the selfless efforts you have put into working with our Group overtime. Keep up the good work and I wish you all the best for the future.

    Like

    1. Thank you Elizabeth. It is a long walk to get to the point where we can begin to see a real difference. But we will get there, one step at a time. Thank you for your continuing support.

      Like

  3. Olusola says:

    Nice remarks.

    Like

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